Jal Mahal

Jal Mahal

Jaipur, Rajasthan | 2011

The scenography of the Jal Mahal interiors illustrates the notion of pleasure pavilions, such as Jal Mahal, where the project is situated. The space celebrates the courtly arts of the 18th cent., for which Siddhartha has visualised the space, and conceived about 40 works in collaboration with 30 traditional miniature painters and local craftspeople.

The scenography of the Jal Mahal interiors illustrates the notion of pleasure pavilions, such as Jal Mahal, where the project is situated. The space celebrates the courtly arts of the 18th cent., for which Siddhartha has visualised the space, and conceived about 40 works in collaboration with 30 traditional miniature painters and local craftspeople.

Monsoon Unfolding Mural, East Wing
The visitor enters the first wing with a glimpse of the Jal Mahal, as a painted part of large Mural, with thunderous clouds, water and the Chameli Bagh on the left, and calmer skies and dense vegetation on the right. The collage created by us here is an indicative one for the commissioned painters to execute this mural.

Joys of Jal Mahal, South Wing
Each Wing is announced by an iconic graphic that sits at the top of the gateway like entrance to the thematic wings. The graphical detail in this wing is that of boats, clouds and water.

Mela Mahal, West Wing
This wing is dedicated to the festivals, the art of celebration, and the seasons. We start with the Baramasa and move on to the colourful festival of Holi, and the depiction of the main festivals. Jewellery and the art of adornment are also included here.
Graphic that sits on the top of the gateway-like entrance to the thematic wings.

Gardens of Pleasure, North Wing
This range is dedicated to the pleasures of gardens. Feasting, music and dance, swings, playing with pigeons, and playing games like chaupar, are portrayed through paintings. Ragamala paintings and references to the Jaipur gharana of Kathak are used for the music and dance room. The walls are painted with traditional flower designs on a large scale. The central Tibari will have a low takhat painted with a decorative chaupar design.